Jamison Ross, All For One

By Giovanni Russonello

Jamison Ross won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition for the drums in 2012 by playing a reliable hand: He eschewed pyrotechnic displays in favor of a buoyant, catalytic pulse, gently interweaving some New Orleans funk into his standard jazz swing. He was framing himself less as an innovator and more as the guardian of some new, hybridized tradition. Since then Mr. Ross, 29, has recorded two albums, both a mix of originals and covers with heavy debts to the jazz and R&B of the Crescent City, his adopted hometown. On the title track from the second album, he covers a little-known New Orleans R&B gem, superimposing the whirlpool syncopation of an Elvin Jones beat onto what was once a perky doo-wop tune. His vocals verge into a deep croon, betraying influences from all over the map: the jazz singer Gregory Porter, the gospel star Marvin Sapp, and a singing drummer from an earlier era, Grady Tate. G.R